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Reprogrammed Cells for Patients in Japan

Parkinson’s disease news: a new clinical trial, a new face of the disease  (Kevin McCormack)

In his long and illustrious career Alan Alda has worn many hats. First as the star of the hit TV show “M*A*S*H” (the season finale of that is still the most watched TV showever), then as a writer, director and movie star and, more recently, as the face of popular science and science communications. This week Alda revealed that he has Parkinson’s disease (PD).

In a post on Twitter he said:

“I have decided to let people know I have Parkinson’s to encourage others to take action. I was Diagnosed 3 and a half years ago, but my life is full. I act, I give talks, I do my podcast, which I love. If you get a diagnosis, keep moving!”

CIRM Board member David Higgins echoed those sentiments in an interview on KUSI TV News, San Diego. Dr. Higgins is the patient advocate member for Parkinson’s on the Board, and was diagnosed with PD in 2011, he says being active physically and intellectually are important in helping cope with PD and leading a normal life.

There was also some encouraging news about PD on the research front. Scientists in Japan are about to start a clinical trial using iPSCs to treat people with PD. The cells are created by taking blood stem cells from healthy donors and turning them into dopaminergic progenitors, precursors to the kind of cell destroyed by PD. The cells will then be transplanted into the brains of seven patients with PD.

The researchers, from Kyoto University, say previous studies show the cells could survive in monkeys for up to two years and help improve symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in the primates.

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